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  The Workshop will consist of seven plenary scientific sessions and four special sessions:

      

Session 1: Microscopic simulation 

   

  The goals of this session are the development of microscopic numerical simulation models for the elementary physical and chemical processes and study of fault rheological properties and constitutive relations. This interdisciplinary field is of essential importance for the understanding of scaling from microscopic to larger scales. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, the micro-model construction (physical/chemical processes), study of micro-mechanisms and emergent behaviour, fault zone constitutive laws, damage mechanisms, rupture nucleation, granular mechanics (fault gouge), and the frictional instability.

   

Session 2: Scaling physics

   

  The goals of this session are to develop theory and understanding of emergent behaviours resulting from the underlying physics and nonlinear dynamics of fault zones and crustal fault systems. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, study of scaling domains, emergent behaviors, role of fluctuations & fundamental physics, field theories, multi-scale, and multi-resolution physics.

   

Session 3: Macro-scale simulation: Earthquake generation and cycles

   

  The goals of this session are to develop macroscopic domain numerical simulation models for the earthquake generation process (based on continuum mechanics) including the complete cycle from tectonic loading, quasi-static rupture nucleation, to dynamic rupture, to fault lithification and healing, and to gain understanding of the earthquake cycle & crustal movement, and seismicity & spatio-temporal patterns of interacting fault systems. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, construction of macroscopic domain numerical simulation models for long time scale processes and the earthquake cycle. Study of macro-phenomena including stress transfer, long range inter-actions in fault systems, effective constitutive laws (consequences), dynamic rupture processes, and the earthquake cycle.

   

Session 4: Macro-scale simulation: Dynamic rupture and wave propagation

   

  The goals of this session are to develop macroscopic domain numerical simulation models for short time scale dynamic processes including dynamic rupture, wave propagation and strong ground motion, and to develop the definition of standard models in different tectonic settings. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, construction of macroscopic domain simulation models for short time scale processes and wave propagation, definition of standards including "standard earth models" in different tectonic settings, code standards, data repositories, data formats, and attenuation functions.

   

Session 5: Computational environment and algorithms

   

  The goals of this session are the development of computational methods and algorithms for the simulation models, and common tools/routines for their computation on super-parallel computer systems. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, development of numerical algorithms, algorithms catalog & handbook, computational environment, distributed computing, collaboratories, XML, CORBA, objects, web-based computing, parallel computing and visualisation technologies.

   

Session 6: Data assimilation and understanding

   

  The goals of this session are to compare the theoretical forecasts of numerical simulation models to data observations and use these comparisons as a basis to gain insight into the earthquake cycle and earthquake behaviour. Provide feedback to the Simulation Working Groups needed for the model refinement process. Data may include "real-time data" and "static data". Examples include seismicity, laboratory/rock physics, crustal deformation/GPS, geo-elasto-magnetic, electro-magnetic emissions, groundwater, and earth structure. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, data inversion, pattern processing, data mining tools development and application.

   

Session 7: Model applications

   

  The goals of this session are the development of applications using new simulation capabilities such as earthquake forecasting, space-time hazard quantification, strong ground motion prediction, scenario modelling, and industrial applications. The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to,strong ground motion studies, earthquake forecast tests and evaluations, benchmarks - model "shoot-outs", define set of standard problems, industrial/engineering applications, dams, buildings, structures, built environment, geophysical exploration, mining, geomechanics, materials engineering, etc.

   

Special Session 1: Earthquake simulation and forecast in China: State-of-the-art and future prospective (invited-only presentations)

   

  This session of China, the local host of this workshop, is organized by China, but not limited for China. The invited –only presentations aim at the filling in of the cultural and language gaps in earthquake simulation and forecast. The organizer welcomes comments and suggestions from the ACES community, and tries to foster closer and broader cooperation with ACES.

   

Special Session 2: The lure of LURR — Celebration of Professor Yin’s 80th Birthday

   

  The goal of this session is to honor Prof. X.C. Yin’s contributions to ACES and research achievement of earthquake forecasting. The theory, methodology, algorithm and practice of Load/Unload Response Ratio developed by him will be reported to celebrate his 80th birthday.

  This session is a tribute to professor X.C. Yin, one of the pioneer organizers of ACES, at the opportunity of his 80th birthday. The development of ACES relies on the persistent and unselfish contribution of scientists such as professor Yin.

   

Special Session 3: Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Tsunami Early Warning System: Models, Simulations, Data and Technology

   

  The goals of this session are to develop the science and technology for a GNSS tsunami early warning system that is intended for deployment around the Pacific Rim.  The past decade has witnessed a terrible loss of life and economic disruption caused by large earthquakes and resultant tsunamis impacting coastal communities and infrastructure across the Indo-Pacific region. While investment and collaboration to strengthen the early warning and mitigation systems have improved measurement and modelling for ‘distant’ tsunamis generated from earthquakes far across an ocean basin the science and technology now exists to provide near real-time visualization as tsunamis propagate around the world and to reduce significantly the risk from tsunamis generated near the. This is accomplished through the use of real-time GNSS measurements in combination with other observations that measure both ground displacements generated by large earthquakes and disturbances in the ionosphere from the propagating wave.  The presentation and discussion of the session are focusing on, but limited to, science, technology and data associated with the development and deployment of a real-time GNSS tsunami early warning system.

   

Special Session 4: The April 24, 2015 Magnitude 7.8 Lamjung (Kathmandu), Nepal Earthquake

   

  The earthquake that occurred on April 24 devastated the city of Kathmandu, and killed more than 5000 persons.  With a maximum Mercalli Intensity of IX, the earthquake induced severe ground shaking, avalanches in the Himalaya, and widespread destruction.  The earthquake was a thrust event on a shallow dipping plane down to the north.  The largest previous earthquake in the region was the 1934 Nepal-Bihar earthquake, which also caused widespread damage and loss of life.  This special session will review timely research on the causes and consequences of the earthquake, and will bring together practitioners to exchange data and information on the event.